Far Infrared (FIR) Therapy for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

1.     The effects of repeated (Far Infrared- FIR) thermal therapy for two patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

J Psychosom Res. 2005 Apr;58(4):383-7.

Masuda A1, Kihara T, Fukudome T, Shinsato T, Minagoe S, Tei C.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This paper describes the successful treatment of two patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) using repeated thermal therapy.

METHODS:

Two patients with CFS underwent treatment with prednisolone (PSL), with no satisfactory effect. They were subjected to thermal therapy that consisted of a far-infrared ray dry sauna at 60 degrees C and postsauna warming. The therapy was performed once a day, for a total of 35 sessions. After discharge, these subjects continued the therapy once or twice a week on an outpatient basis for 1 year.

RESULTS:

Symptoms such as fatigue, pain, sleep disturbance, and low-grade fever were dramatically improved after 15 to 25 sessions of thermal therapy. Although PSL administration was discontinued, the subjects showed no relapse or exacerbation of symptoms during the first year after discharge. The patients became socially rehabilitated 6 months after discharge.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that repeated (Far Infrared-FIR) thermal therapy might be a promising method for the treatment of CFS.

2.     A new treatment: (Far Infrared) thermal therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome.

[Article in Japanese]

Nippon Rinsho Jpn J Clin Med 2007 Jun;65(6):1093-8

Masuda A1, Munemoto T, Tei C.

Abstract

Thermal therapy using far-infrared ray dry sauna was performed for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Symptoms such as fatigue, pain, and low-grade fever were dramatically improved on two patients. And prednisolone administration was discontinued and became socially rehabilitated 6 months after discharge. On other 11 patients with CFS, physical symptoms such as fatigue and pain improved, too. Furthermore, we reported that repeated thermal therapy had relaxation effect and diminishes appetite loss and subjective complaints in mildly depressed patients. These results suggest that repeated thermal therapy may be a promising method for the treatment of CFS.

3. Effects of Waon (Far Infrared) Therapy on Chronic Fatigue
    Syndrome

Soejima Y1, Munemoto T, Masuda A, Uwatoko Y, Miyata M, Tei C.

Abstract

Objective Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disabling condition of unknown etiology, and no definitive therapy has been identified to date. We developed Waon therapy, a form of thermal therapy using a far-infrared dry sauna, and in this study herein examined its feasibility and safety in patients with CFS.

Methods: Ten consecutive inpatients with CFS stayed in a 60°C sauna for 15 minutes and then rested on a bed under a blanket for an additional 30 minutes outside the sauna room. The treatments were performed once a day, five days a week for four weeks. Perceived fatigue, the primary outcome measure, was evaluated using a numerical rating scale before, during (two weeks after the commencement of therapy) and after therapy. The pain level, evaluated using a numerical rating scale, mood, assessed using the Profile of Mood States questionnaire, and performance status, assessed using a scale developed for CFS patients were also examined before and after therapy.

Results: Perceived fatigue significantly decreased after therapy, although no significant reductions were observed during therapy. In addition, a negative mood, including anxiety, depression and fatigue, and the performance status significantly improved after therapy. However, the levels of pain and vigor did not change significantly. No patients reported any adverse effects during the therapy.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that Waon therapy may be a useful and safe treatment for CFS.